nprbooks:

Today, June 25, is George Orwell’s birthday!

To mark the occasion, here are some awesome Ralph Steadman illustrations of Orwell’s anti-totalitarian classic, Animal Farm. (There are lots more over on Brainpickings.)

kenobi-wan-obi:


i love to singa
about the moon-a and the june-a and the spring-a


I was having a bad morning…and then this made everything a little bit better.

kenobi-wan-obi:

i love to singa

about the moon-a and the june-a and the spring-a

I was having a bad morning…and then this made everything a little bit better.

(via callmecrayola)

poetrysince1912:


The caged bird sings
with a fearful trill   
of things unknown   
but longed for still   
and his tune is heard   
on the distant hill   
for the caged bird   
sings of freedom.



RIP Maya Angelou
http://bit.ly/1mFEnQE 

poetrysince1912:

The caged bird sings

with a fearful trill   

of things unknown   

but longed for still   

and his tune is heard   

on the distant hill   

for the caged bird   

sings of freedom.

phoebewahl:

I painted my favorite quote by my favorite poet in my sketchbook.
From "Wild Geese" by Mary Oliver. 
Painted by me, Phoebe Wahl, 2014. 


From my favorite poem, ever.

phoebewahl:

I painted my favorite quote by my favorite poet in my sketchbook.

From "Wild Geese" by Mary Oliver. 

Painted by me, Phoebe Wahl, 2014. 

From my favorite poem, ever.

(via killyouranxiety)

outofprintclothing:

Remembering Emily Dickinson, who died on this day, May 15, in 1886.

outofprintclothing:

Remembering Emily Dickinson, who died on this day, May 15, in 1886.

bookriot:

Happy California Bookstore Day! 
Are you celebrating by hitting your favorite store and scoring some new reads? Or maybe you’re eager to try out a new shop? 
Here’s a roundup of some favorite bookstores in the state. 

bookriot:

Happy California Bookstore Day! 

Are you celebrating by hitting your favorite store and scoring some new reads? Or maybe you’re eager to try out a new shop? 

Here’s a roundup of some favorite bookstores in the state

thefinalimage:

The Thin Man | 1934 | dir. Woody Van Dyke

thefinalimage:

The Thin Man | 1934 | dir. Woody Van Dyke

"

four drab women
Want Hardship Worry Guilt
wait somewhere far away

a person is born
grows
starts a family
builds a home

the four ghouls
wait
hidden in the foundations

"

From “cobweb" by Tadeusz Różewicz. The Polish poet and playwright, who was a member of the resistance during Germany’s occupation of Poland in World War II, has died, according to reports in the Polish press. He was 92. Writing in The Guardian, the British-Hungarian poet George Szirtes called him “one of the great European ‘witness’ poets whose own lives were directly affected by the seismic events of the 20th century.”

Różewicz’s older brother was killed by the Gestapo in 1944, and Różewicz made it his mission to refute Theodor Adorno’s dictum that it is barbaric to create poetry after the atrocities committed at Auschwitz. Różewicz wrote, “at home a task / awaits me: / To create poetry after Auschwitz.” Czeslaw Milosz wrote in an anthology of Polish poetry that Różewicz’s “first poems published immediately after the war are short, nearly stenographic notes of horror, disgust, and derision of human values. Long before anybody in Poland had heard of Samuel Beckett, Różewicz’s imagination created equally desperate landscapes.”

More book news here.

(via nprbooks)

vintageanchorbooks:

"Bored" by Margaret Atwood "All those times I was boredout of my mind. Holding the logwhile he sawed it. Holdingthe string while he measured, boards,distances between things, or poundedstakes into the ground for rows and rowsof lettuces and beets, which I then (bored)weeded. Or sat in the backof the car, or sat still in boats,sat, sat, while at the prow, stern, wheelhe drove, steered, paddled. Itwasn’t even boredom, it was looking,looking hard and up close at the smalldetails. Myopia. The worn gunwales,the intricate twill of the seatcover. The acid crumbs of loam, the granularpink rock, its igneous veins, the sea-fansof dry moss, the blackish and then the grayingbristles on the back of his neck.Sometimes he would whistle, sometimesI would. The boring rhythm of doingthings over and over, carryingthe wood, dryingthe dishes. Such minutiae. It’s whatthe animals spend most of their time at,ferrying the sand, grain by grain, from their tunnels,shuffling the leaves in their burrows. He pointedsuch things out, and I would lookat the whorled texture of his square finger, earth underthe nail. Why do I remember it as sunnierall the time then, although it more oftenrained, and more birdsong?I could hardly wait to getthe hell out of there toanywhere else. Perhaps thoughboredom is happier. It is for dogs orgroundhogs. Now I wouldn’t be bored.Now I would know too much.Now I would know.”

vintageanchorbooks:

"Bored" by Margaret Atwood

"All those times I was bored
out of my mind. Holding the log
while he sawed it. Holding
the string while he measured, boards,
distances between things, or pounded
stakes into the ground for rows and rows
of lettuces and beets, which I then (bored)
weeded. Or sat in the back
of the car, or sat still in boats,
sat, sat, while at the prow, stern, wheel
he drove, steered, paddled. It
wasn’t even boredom, it was looking,
looking hard and up close at the small
details. Myopia. The worn gunwales,
the intricate twill of the seat
cover. The acid crumbs of loam, the granular
pink rock, its igneous veins, the sea-fans
of dry moss, the blackish and then the graying
bristles on the back of his neck.
Sometimes he would whistle, sometimes
I would. The boring rhythm of doing
things over and over, carrying
the wood, drying
the dishes. Such minutiae. It’s what
the animals spend most of their time at,
ferrying the sand, grain by grain, from their tunnels,
shuffling the leaves in their burrows. He pointed
such things out, and I would look
at the whorled texture of his square finger, earth under
the nail. Why do I remember it as sunnier
all the time then, although it more often
rained, and more birdsong?
I could hardly wait to get
the hell out of there to
anywhere else. Perhaps though
boredom is happier. It is for dogs or
groundhogs. Now I wouldn’t be bored.
Now I would know too much.
Now I would know.”

(via booklover)

utterlyvintage:

Happy 450th Will, 23rd April 2014

utterlyvintage:

Happy 450th Will, 23rd April 2014

(via ffordefans)

video-game-foliage:

And just like that the bastion comes alive. Starts growin’ again. Growin’ stronger.

Another game that mixes beautiful 2D art with 3D gameplay, the plants in Bastion are gorgeous. From the swirling patterns carved into the ground to the grass growing off the floating tiles, foliage is used through the game to break up the grid-based tile system’s straight lines.

Bastion (2011)

2014 Book Challenge

15. Lady Knight, Tamora Pierce (409) [reread]

fashionsfromhistory:

Costume Worn by Jeremy Brett as Sherlock Holmes
Esther Dean
1980s-1990s
Bonhams

fashionsfromhistory:

Costume Worn by Jeremy Brett as Sherlock Holmes

Esther Dean

1980s-1990s

Bonhams

fashionsfromhistory:

Costume Worn by Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes in “The Hound of Baskerville”
Gwen Wakeling
1939
Bonhams

fashionsfromhistory:

Costume Worn by Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes in “The Hound of Baskerville”

Gwen Wakeling

1939

Bonhams

2014 Book Challenge

14. Squire, Tamora Pierce (380) [reread]